Laying the Foundations

As I discovered while writing The Scourge of Rome, historical fiction requires a ton of research. Even if you think you know everything there is to know about a topic or time period, you don’t. And so out come the books and the maps.

Everyone seems to have their own preferred method of research, which is as it should be. Personally, I prefer to read a modern account (or two or three) to get the lay of the land, establish characters, events, themes and the like, and then dive in to the primary sources. Dealing with the ancient world, these are often less than ideal, but I prefer to read them myself just in case I come to some different interpretation of events.

Once I feel the story starting to come together, I sketch out a rough outline. This usually begins with dropping events into chapters and adding a few thoughts. As I go, the outline gets more and more fleshed out, and once it’s in a place I’m happy with, it’s on to the story synopsis.

But I get ahead of myself. I’m just embarking on the research phase, and this time around I’m hoping to work a bit more efficiently than in the past. To that end, I’m planning to start with three documents:

  1. Events – This one’s pretty self-explanatory. A running catalog of events, supplemented by thoughts and interpretations. As I go I’ll probably break this out into sections – so a section for Belisarius’ early career, one for the first Persian War, another for the Nika Riots, and so on.
  2. Persons of Interest – Basically a running character compendium that will help me keep track of personalities. Even at thsi early stage I’m struck at the level of detail available for Belisarius’ various commanders and soldiers (half of whom seem to be named John). All notes will be tagged with source and page number for easy reference later.
  3. Random Thoughts and Story Ideas – As I research, I often find scenes or themes or character beats jumping out at me. This document will provide a place to capture all of them.

So that’s where I’m at. Now it’s time to crack open Belisarius: The Last Roman General by Ian Hughes…

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